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Retirement

A superannuation disability pension is a monthly pension that may commence before the plan’s regular retirement ages if a qualifying Permanent Disability prevents an eligible member from working.

Who is eligible?

You can apply for a Superannuation disability pension if you are prevented from working due to a Permanent Disability and:

  • You are an employee or deferred member,
  • You have ten (10) or more years of qualifying service,
  • You are under age 60 and your age and qualifying service total less than 80, and
  • You have not commenced your pension.

How do I apply?

You can obtain an application form online or by contacting our office at 204 946-3200.

What is the process?

  • When you file a disability pension application with the Board, we will request a medical report from your Attending Physician. You are financially responsible for this report.
  • The Board at its expense will obtain reports from one or more Consulting Specialists.
  • We will also request a report from your employer concerning your work duties.
  • The Board will review your application and all relevant medical reports and advise you of the decision by letter.

Are there different classifications of disability?

The Board determines your eligibility for a disability pension and the classification (Total or Partial) based on medical information provided by your physician(s) and other selected medical specialists.

  • Permanent Disability: A permanent disability, in relation to a partial disability or total disability, means prolonged, in the sense that the disability is likely to be long continued and of indefinite duration, or likely to result in death.
  • Total Disability: A total disability pension would be granted where the Board has determined that you are unable to do any substantially gainful work based on your education and experience.
  • Partial Disability: A partial disability pension would be granted where the Board has determined that you are unable to work in your own position, based on age, education and experience, despite that you may be able to work, even on a full-time basis, in a different position.

How much would I receive?

  • If you are granted a Superannuation disability pension, you will receive a monthly payment based on the pension plan formula, which includes your years of service and earnings to your effective date.
  • A Total disability pension is equal to the pension accrued to the effective date.
  • A Partial disability pension is equal to the pension accrued to the effective date less a reduction based on age and service. Partial disability benefits are reduced to the same extent as early retirement benefits.

How long is the disability pension paid?

A Superannuation disability pension is only payable if:

  1. You are an employee who has been approved for benefits under an eligible Long Term Disability (LTD) program, OR
  2. You have ceased to be an employee and provide a Notice of Disability Retirement.

Employee: If you are an employee approved for Long Term Disability (LTD) benefits, you are deemed not to have retired under The Civil Service Superannuation Act except for the sole purpose of applying for and being granted a Superannuation disability pension. Under this arrangement, the Board is only authorized to pay your disability pension during the time that you are approved for LTD benefits.

Ceasing to be an employee: Should LTD terminate or not approve your claim, the Board is only authorized to pay the disability pension if you cease to be an employee and provide a formal Notice of Disability Retirement.

Duration of Superannuation disability pension payment: Payment of the disability pension continues until: your LTD benefits end; you return to work; you no longer meet the definition of disability; you are eligible for your unreduced pension, or death.

Questions? The Board’s staff is available to provide information and answer questions about the plan and your entitlements. The Board’s staff can be contacted by:

Mail: The Civil Service Superannuation Board

1200-444 St. Mary Ave.

Winnipeg MB R3C 3T1

Phone: 204-946-3200 or Toll Free (Canada): 1-800-432-5134

Fax: 204-945-0237

E-mail: askus@cssb.mb.ca Web Page: www.cssb.mb.ca

Printable version available.

If you are considering retirement, there are a number of things to think about as your retirement date approaches. The following are suggested timeframes to ensure you receive all relevant information and meet all of the Civil Service Superannuation Board deadlines for forms submissions.

Prior to your retirement date, you must notify your employer of your intention to retire. The CSSB works closely with the employers who participate in the pension plan. However, until your retirement date has passed, your employer will not notify us of your retirement, and we won’t discuss your retirement plans with your employer.

Within Two Years of Retirement

  • If you aren’t already registered for CSSB Online Services, sign up! Once registered as an employee, your access will continue as a pensioner.
  • Use the Pension Estimate function in the Online Services to begin seeing and understanding what options are available to you.
  • If you have periods of employment that aren’t included as pensionable service, you may want to investigate your option to purchase all or some of the service.
  • If you have any questions about your CSSB pension, contact a CSSB Client Services representative.
  • Attend a CSSB PreRetirement Seminar or view one online.
  • Contact your Human Resources/Payroll department to discuss vacation banking.
  • Contact a financial planner if you require assistance with your decisions.

Within 18 Months of Retirement

  • Research the retiree health insurance plans to determine which is best for you and your family. If you participate in the group life insurance plan, you can view a retirement insurance estimate when you run a pension estimate. Evaluate your life insurance needs in comparison to your current employee coverage and consider any conversion rights. Your employer can confirm your employee group insurance coverage and your beneficiary designation.
  • Review your estate plan and make sure your will, trust, and powers of attorney are up to date.

Within One Year of Retirement

  • Use the Pension Estimate function in the Online Services.
  • If you have any questions about your CSSB pension, contact a CSSB Client Services representative.
  • Gather any proofs of age and supporting documents needed to apply for your CSSB pension. We must have all necessary proofs of age before any benefits can be paid. These documents can be submitted by fax or through the Send CSSB A Document function in your Online Services account. Do not mail original documents to the CSSB, because they will not be returned.
  • Contact your Human Resources/Payroll department for information on employer benefits such as severance pay, vacation accruals and cash outs, etc.
  • Contact Service Canada for information on your Canada Pension Plan and Old Age Security benefits.

Within Six Months of Retirement

  • Carefully review the pension payment options. Decide which fits your needs and those of your family. Remember, you can’t change the option or your survivor pension beneficiary after your retirement date.
  • Review the health insurance plans offered and decide on a plan. Ensure that your post-retirement coverage will start when your employment ends.
  • Notify your Human Resource/Payroll office of your intention to retire.
  • Complete and submit your CSSB Retirement Forms before your retirement date. Suggested reading: Applying for a Retirement Pension.

Within Two Months of Retirement

  • If required, complete and submit The Pension Benefits Act Spousal Waiver Form 5A to the CSSB.
  • Contact Canada Life if you wish to convert your group life insurance or dependents insurance.

Once You’re Retired

  • Suggested reading: What to expect after you apply for your pension
  • The CSSB will provide you with documentation when your final employment information from your employer has been received, verified and finalized with the CSSB. This may take several months after your retirement date.
  • Watch for your pension payments on the 2nd last business day of each month.
  • Watch for email notifications from the CSSB when your monthly statement, T4A, and pensioner newsletter are available.
  • Keep us updated with your current street address, phone number, and email address. This can be done through the Edit My Profile function in your Online Services account or by phone, mail or email.

Important note: If mail is returned from the last known address of the pension recipient, the CSSB will make reasonable attempts to contact the recipient and update the information. Upon the discretion of the CSSB, further pension payments may cease until contact is made with the pension recipient.

When you retire, a number of pension options will be available to you, depending on your relationship status at that time. The pension option applies to the basic pension and any bridging amounts, but not to any integration or cost-of-living adjustments.

Lifetime

This pension is payable to you for life with no payments continuing to a beneficiary.

2/3 to Survivor

This is a reduced pension based on your age and the age of your spouse or partner and is payable to you for life. Starting the month after your death, this spouse or partner would be paid two-thirds of your pension. He or she would receive that pension for life. If your spouse or partner predeceases you, no pension will be payable following your death.

1/2 to Survivor

This is a reduced pension based on your age and the age of your spouse or partner and is payable to you for life. Starting the month after your death, this spouse or partner would be paid one-half of your pension. He or she would receive that pension for life. If your spouse or partner predeceases you, no pension will be payable following your death.

Full to Survivor

This is a reduced pension based on your age and the age of your spouse or partner and is payable to you for life. Starting the month after your death, this spouse or partner would be paid a pension equal to your pension. He or she would receive that pension for life. If your spouse or partner predeceases you, no pension will be payable following your death.

Minimum 10 Year

This is a reduced pension based on your age and is payable to you for life. If your death should occur within 10 years of your retirement date, starting the month after your death, payment would be made to the named beneficiary or beneficiaries for the balance of the 10 years.

Minimum 15 Year

This is a reduced pension based on your age and is payable to you for life. If your death should occur within 15 years of your retirement date, starting the month after your death, payment would be made to the named beneficiary or beneficiaries for the balance of the 15 years.

Other Options

Other forms of pension are also available. A member may apply for any form of pension that is acceptable under the Income Tax Act (Canada) and is approved by the Board.

Other Information

For the Lifetime and any survivor pension (e.g., 2/3 to Survivor, 1/2 to Survivor, and Full Survivor), when the pensioner and the spouse or partner have both passed away, the estate would receive any amount of the deceased pensioner’s contributions and interest which exceeds the total pension payments made.

For minimum guarantee pensions (eg. 10 Year or 15 Year), if the pensioner dies before the end of the minimum guarantee period, the pension would be payable to the designated beneficiary or beneficiaries. If a designated beneficiary has pre-deceased the

member, the share of the deceased beneficiary will be paid in equal portions to the surviving beneficiary(ies). If no beneficiary has been designated or there is no surviving beneficiary, the remaining pension would be payable to the member’s surviving spouse or

common-law partner, or if none, to the member’s estate. If a beneficiary who is receiving the pension dies before the end of the guarantee period, the remaining pension would be payable to that beneficiary’s estate.

All survivor and minimum guarantee pensions include 2/3rds of the pensioner’s accumulated cost-of-living adjustments and 2/3rds of any future cost-of-living adjustments.

Changes to Insurance Prior to Retirement

Changes to the Class of Life insurance or Units of Dependents Insurance can be made prior to retirement. Applications for insurance changes prior to retirement are available from your employer.

Retirement Insurance

If you were insured on your retirement date and immediately commence your pension, Life insurance, and where applicable Dependents insurance, automatically continue at reduced amounts, and premiums would automatically be deducted from your pension.

You can elect to not pay premiums at retirement or anytime thereafter. If you make this election for Life Insurance, coverage would reduce to $4,500. If you make this election for Dependents Insurance, coverage would stop entirely. If you elect to stop paying premiums, you are not permitted to increase your insurance at a later date.

Conversion

Conversion allows an individual to continue insurance privately, at private rates, without providing evidence of insurability. Any amount up to the reduction that occurs because of retirement can be converted to a private policy within 60 days of ceasing to be an employee. Only the initial decrease in Life Insurance can be converted. Any decreases in Dependents Insurance, where applicable, can be converted as they occur. For information on converting insurance or to apply for conversion, please contact Deborah Capek at 204-297-6224 or deborah@capekfinancial.ca.

Waiver of Premium

If a member ceases to be an employee due to ill health or injury before age 65 or is in receipt of a disability pension, he or she may apply for a waiver of premium. If the Insurance Company considers the member totally and permanently disabled, no premium payments are required and Life Insurance will continue in force as if the member had remained employed until the earlier of recovery, death or age 65. If a person ceases to be eligible for a waiver of premium and is receiving a pension, retirement insurance provisions would apply. Application for a waiver of premium must be made within 365 days after a member ceases to be an employee. Members can apply through the employer if still employed, or through the Board if no longer employed.

Assumptions Used for Insurance Estimate

Information provided by your employer after you retire will be used to determine any insurance amounts. Estimated insurance amounts usually assume your salary, class of insurance, and units if applicable, remain unchanged from the end of the previous year. This will provide a conservative estimate unless you elect to reduce your insurance or you become ineligible. There is usually a difference between estimated and actual insurance. As the difference between the date the estimate is prepared and your retirement date gets smaller, so typically does the difference between the estimate and the actual amounts. We are unable to calculate actual insurance until after an employee has retired. We recommend that you use a slightly conservative estimate for your retirement planning.

You may want to contact your employer to determine your coverage and confirm your beneficiary designation as you approach retirement.

Employers Excluded from Policy

Employees of the Manitoba Arts Council, Manitoba Film and Sound Recording Development Corporation (effective as of the date of the Order in Council approving this exclusion), Sports Manitoba Inc., and Manitoba Liquor and Lotteries (effective August 1, 2014), as well as those employees covered by a collective agreement between the government of Manitoba and the Canadian Union of Public Employees (C.U.P.E.) Local 2153, are excluded under the Public Service Group Insurance policies administered by the Board.

Employees of these employers may want to check with their payroll or Human Resources department to see if alternate insurance coverage is available.

Frequently Asked Questions – Retirement

You have two (2) options. You can:

  • Run your own estimate using Online Services

If you are registered for Online Services, you can run pension estimates and termination estimates using your actual account information and the same calculator we use in our office. This allows you to access the information when it’s convenient for you. You can also complete your retirement forms using the “Complete Retirement Forms” feature of Online Services. Here is the link cssb.mypension.ca

  • Request a pension estimate from our staff

You can contact our office to request a pension estimate.

The normal retirement age for all members is 65. The earliest retirement age is 55, except for Correctional Officers who could retire as early as age 50 provided the member’s age plus qualifying service add up to at least a total of 75.

Suggested reading: Applying for a Retirement Pension.

Your pension is a benefit that you apply for.  It is not automatically paid upon retirement.  The following steps will assist you in the application process for your CSSB retirement pension:

  1. Select your retirement date and ensure that you are eligible to retireThe Plan allows a retirement date to be any day of the year. You can retire if you are at least age 55, are no longer an employee in the Plan and have provided a Notice of Retirement to the Board. If you are a Correctional Officer, you can retire between ages 50 and 55 if the combination of your age and service totals at least 75.
  2. Notify your Employer of your intention to retireWe do not notify your employer of your retirement. You must contact your Human Resources department or Pay and Benefits office to notify them of your retirement date. You will be required to provide your employer with a written retirement notice prior to your pension commencement date. You may want to confirm with your employer how much advance notice is required.
  3. Obtain a pension estimate and retirement forms
    • a) From the CSSB office: You can request retirement forms and a pension estimate from our office up to six (6) months prior to your retirement date. OR
    • b) From Online Services: If you are registered for Online Services, you can obtain pension estimates and complete your retirement forms online. This feature allows you to print your completed forms for signature and submission to the CSSB office, or you can have CSSB print your completed forms and mail them to you for your signature and submission. Automatic edits in the online process help reduce potential problems and errors.
  4. Submit your completed retirement forms to CSSB prior to your retirement dateIt is important that you provide your retirement forms and supporting documentation to CSSB before your retirement date. A delay in submitting forms may result in a loss of pension payments, and certain defaults may apply.You can arrange to meet with our office staff who can answer any questions you may have and assist you with completion of your retirement forms.
  5. Provide your proof of age documentWe require your proof of age and will accept a photocopy of one of the following:
    • birth certificate,
    • valid Canadian passport,
    • valid drivers license,
    • Canadian Citizenship card or
    • Permanent Resident card.

    If you have a spouse or common-law partner who is the beneficiary of a survivor pension, we will also require a copy of their proof of age.

Your pension is calculated as follows:

2% of your Best Five Year Average Pensionable Earnings multiplied by pensionable service

minus

0.4% of the Average Canada Pension Plan Pensionable Earnings multiplied by your pensionable service

Note: Of the pension you receive, the Income Tax Act may limit the amount that can be paid from a registered pension plan. Any amount above that limit would be paid as unregistered pension.

A retroactive salary adjustment may increase your pension if it increases your Best Five Year Average Pensionable Salary.

Salary for pension purposes is defined in The Civil Service Superannuation Act and includes your regular remuneration (with any eligible vacation cash-out) and excludes anything else that does not form part of your regular remuneration. Regular remuneration is typically determined by the employer and may be defined in a collective agreement or employment contract. If a retroactive increase is considered by the employer as pensionable salary, the employer will report that salary to the CSSB.

We would do a recalculation to include retroactive salary paid to a former employee who has resigned, been dismissed, or died, if the former employee or his or her spouse, common-law partner or eligible survivor is entitled to a pension.

Vacation pay paid in lieu of time off when you are still employed is not pensionable and employee contributions will not be deducted by your employer.

Vacation pay paid on termination or retirement can be included as pensionable earnings up to the lesser of:

  • 2 years of regular vacation accruals (based on the most recent 2 years of service prior to termination or retirement), or
  • 50 days

Please note that the maximum accrual rate is reduced proportionately if you worked on a part-time basis.

This maximum accrual relates only to the number of days of vacation pay that can be included as pensionable earnings and for which employee contributions are to be deducted. Any vacation days over and above this limit will be paid to you by your employer but will not be included as pensionable earnings and no employee contributions will be deducted.

For example, if an employee is working part-time at 50% and has 6 weeks of vacation entitlement in a year, the maximum vacation days that would be available to include in pensionable earnings would be 30 days.

  • 1st year accrual: 6 weeks x 5 days x 50% = 15 days
  • 2nd year accrual: 6 weeks x 5 days x 50% = 15 days
  • Maximum # of vacation days for pension = 30 days

Confirm with Payroll or HR about the accrual and cashout of your vacation days and what rules, if any, the employer has with regards to how they allow you to bank the days for pension purposes. We do not look after the accumulation or pay out of vacation days. Your employer will report to us how many unused vacation days you are paid out at the time of retirement.

There is nothing in the pension plan rules that prevent a member who is receiving a pension from returning to work. However, once you commence receiving a monthly pension from the Fund, you are not allowed to re-enter the pension plan as an active contributing member. You can be employed with a participating employer, but you will not be allowed to have employee contributions deducted and will not accrue any further new benefits under the pension plan.

If you return to work with an employer who does not participate in the Civil Service Superannuation Fund, you would be able to join that employer’s pension plan (if they have one and you are otherwise eligible).

We’re not aware whether a member will be entitled to severance or to how much he or she might be entitled. Please contact your employer for information on severance.

This is a personal decision. Integration is an option that lets you get a higher pension from the pension plan until age 60 for Canada Pension Plan (CPP) integration and age 65 for Old Age Security (OAS) integration but less pension from the pension plan after those ages. Because your benefits from these three plans can all start at different times, this option may help you level out your income through retirement.

If you retire before age 60 you can integrate your pension with OAS or CPP, or both. If you retire after age 60, but before age 65, you can integrate your pension with OAS. Integration is not available if you are at least age 65 when you retire.

With an integrated pension, you would receive an additional amount of pension from the pension plan until age 60 for integration with CPP and age 65 for integration with OAS. These additional amounts would then cease and your basic pension would be reduced. This reduction is intended to recover the additional amounts previously paid to you. This reduction continues for your lifetime. The plan recovers on average the same amount it pays out. However, as the repayment amounts are based on average life expectancy, each individual may pay back more or less than they received, depending on how long he or she lives.

If you are being paid a minimum guaranteed pension (e.g., 10 or 15 years), CPP integration adjustments would cease upon your death and would not impact any payments made to a beneficiary. If you are under age 65 when you pass away, OAS integration increases would continue to be paid until the earlier of the date you would have reached age 65, or the end of the minimum guarantee period. No reduction to recover the additional amounts paid would be made to a beneficiary payment.

For any form of pension other than a minimum guaranteed pension, integration adjustments apply only during your lifetime, and any increase or decrease would cease upon your death. Survivor pension option amounts payable to a spouse or partner would therefore be no different whether you integrate or not.

Please note that selecting the integration option will not cause your CPP or OAS benefits to start automatically. If you select the integration option, any reductions to your pension from the pension plan at age 60 or 65 will occur as scheduled, regardless of when your CPP and OAS benefits start, how much you actually receive, or any changes that might be made to those plans.

“The Risk: Taking advantage of this early retirement option is a gamble in the sense that individuals may be paying back the debt longer than they collected the benefit.” (Provincial Ombudsman Report)

Spouse or Partner Consent for Integration Election

We are unable to pay an integrated pension to a member with a spouse or common-law partner unless the spouse or common-law partner has provided written consent to the election or the member is living separate and apart from the spouse or common-law partner by reason of a breakdown of their relationship.

This consent can only be given by completing a form required by the Superintendent of Pensions (Form 5B).

Depending on when you submitted retirement forms, our office may not have had enough time to set up your payment before the pensioner payroll was being processed.

Your pension is payable from your date of retirement, and your first monthly payment will be pro-rated if you retire part way through a month. However, in order to make sure that your first pension payment is not delayed, it is important that your completed retirement forms and supporting documentation are provided to us at least a month or two prior to your retirement date.

If you retire before the age of 60 and do not meet the Rule of 80, a bridging benefit would be paid to you until age 65. Bridging offsets a portion of the reduction for early retirement.